Madeira

The archipelago is an oasis in the Atlantic where, among forests, cities, beaches and mountains, a great cultural and natural wealth is preserved. Focussing on the natural heritage, we highlight the imposing Central Mountain Range and the Laurel Forest. The former, with its 8200 hectares, is a Natural Monument and includes some of the island's highest peaks, such as Pico Ruivo or the Bica da Cana area. To the north, the subtropical Laurel forest stands out and, with its 20 million years and 15,000 hectares, contributes to the spectacular landscape of the island. Porto Santo, well known for its long golden sandy beach and turquoise sea, joins these natural treasures, having recently joined the UNESCO World Network of Biosphere Reserves.

 

Madeira produces Madeira wine, a fortified wine with almost unlimited ageing capacity. Its history follows the island's development cycles and there are records that confirm its export 25 years after colonisation began. With around six hundred years of existence and coverage of the globe, its fame and prestige are attested to by countless episodes, one of the most emblematic being the toast celebrating the independence of the United States in 1776. With studies into the adaptation of various regional, national and foreign grape varieties, which began in the 1970s for the production of still wines, some winegrowers took up the challenge and in the 1990s the first plantations were set up exclusively for the production of still wines (DOP Madeirense and IGP Terras Madeirenses).

 

DEMARCATED REGION

 

Madeira

3 REASONS TO VISIT

 

- A multitude of flavours
- Downhill ride in basket cars
- A walk along the “levadas”

ACTIVITIES

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